Richardson, W. (2006) Blogs, wikis, podcasts and other powerful web tools for classrooms. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press ISBN 141 292 767 6
Book Discussion Blog http://tacbook.blogspot.com/

Key Terms

Blog:
A blog (a contraction of the term "Web log") is a Web site, usually maintained by an individual [1], with regular entries of commentary, descriptions of events, or other material such as graphics or video. Entries are commonly displayed in reverse-chronological order. "Blog" can also be used as a verb, meaning to maintain or add content to a blog.
Many blogs provide commentary or news on a particular subject; others function as more personal online diaries. A typical blog combines text, images, and links to other blogs, Web pages, and other media related to its topic. The ability for readers to leave comments in an interactive format is an important part of many blogs.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blog

RSS:
a family of Web feed formats used to publish frequently updated works such as blog entries, news headlines, audio, and video in a standardized format.[2] An RSS document (which is called a "feed," "web feed,"[3] or "channel") includes full or summarized text plus metadata such as publishing dates and authorship. Web feeds benefit publishers by letting them syndicate content quickly and automatically. They benefit readers who want to subscribe to timely updates from favored websites or to aggregate feeds from many sites into one place. RSS feeds can be read using software called an "RSS reader," "feed reader," or an "aggregator," which can be web-based or desktop-based.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RSS_(file_format)

Screencasting:
A screencast is a digital recording of computer screen output, also known as a video screen capture, often containing audio narration. Although the term screencast dates from 2004, products such as Lotus ScreenCam were used as early as 1994.[1][2] Early products produced large files and had limited editing features. More recent products support more compact file formats such as Adobe Flash and have more sophisticated editing features allowing changes in sequence, mouse movement, and audio.
Just as a screenshot is a picture of a user's screen, a screencast is essentially a movie of what a user sees on their monitor. Demo http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/umlaut.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screencast

Videoblog:
Video blogging, sometimes shortened to vlogging [1][2][3] is a form of blogging for which the medium is video.[4] Entries are made regularly and often combine embedded video or a video link with supporting text, images, and other metadata.
Audioblog: An MP3 blog is a type of blog in which the creator makes music files, normally in the MP3 format, available for download. They are also known as "musicblogs" or "audioblogs". MP3 blogs have become increasingly popular since 2003.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MP3_blog

Video logs (vlogs) also often take advantage of web syndication to allow for the distribution of video over the Internet using either the RSS or Atom syndication formats, for automatic aggregation and playback on mobile devices and personal computers (See video podcast).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vlog

Social Bookmarking:
Social bookmarking is a method for Internet users to store, organize, search, and manage bookmarks of web pages on the Internet with the help of metadata. In a social bookmarking system, users save links to web pages that they want to remember and/or share. These bookmarks are usually public, and can be saved privately, shared only with specified people or groups, shared only inside certain networks, or another combination of public and private domains. The allowed people can usually view these bookmarks chronologically, by category or tags, or via a search engine
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_bookmarking

Wiki:
A wiki is a page or collection of Web pages designed to enable anyone who accesses it to contribute or modify content, using a simplified markup language.[1][2] Wikis are often used to create collaborative websites and to power community websites. The collaborative encyclopedia Wikipedia is one of the best-known wikis.[2] Wikis are used in business to provide intranets and Knowledge Management systems. Ward Cunningham, developer of the first wiki software, WikiWikiWeb, originally described it as "the simplest online database that could possibly work".[3]

"Wiki" (/wiːkiː/) is originally a Hawaiian word for "fast"[4].
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiki

Mashup:
web application that combines data from more than one source into a single integrated tool; e.g. use of cartographic data from Google Maps to add location information to real-estate data, thereby creating a new and distinct web service that was not originally provided by either source. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mashup_(web_application_hybrid)

VCOP:
apparently a misnomer as the original concept of a community of practice (CoP) was based around situated learning in a co-located setting. However, with increasing globalization and the continued growth of the Internet many now claim that virtual CoPs do exist (e.g. Murillo, 2006; Hara and Hew, 2007). For example, some [1] claim that a wiki (such as wikipedia.org) is a virtual CoP. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_Community_of_Practice

VLW Virtual Learning World:
These worlds are massive virtual environments, where people spend hours at a time socializing, competing, and most of all, learning.
http://www.virtuallearningworlds.com/2004/09/so-whats-this-whole-virtual-learning.html

MMO Massively multiplayer online game:
Science fiction has also been a popular theme, featuring games such as Anarchy Online, Eve Online, Star Wars Galaxies and The Matrix Online. MMOGs emerged from the hard-core gamer community to the mainstream strongly in December 2003. World of Warcraft is currently the dominant MMOG in the world with more than 60% of the subscribing player base[2], and with 10-11 million monthly subscribers worldwide,[3] is the most popular Western title among MMOGs.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massively_multiplayer_online_game